Shuran Huang

Photographer
  
The Washington Post: Feeding the American dream with their Asian heritage
Location: Washington, D.C.
Nationality: Chinese
Biography: Shuran Huang 黃舒然 (she/her) is a Cantonese photographer based in Washington, D.C. Through seeing intimate moments, her work focuses on politics, immigration, human rights, diaspora experiences, and interactions in between. Shuran speaks English,... MORE
Public Story
The Washington Post: Feeding the American dream with their Asian heritage
Copyright Shuran Huang 2024
Updated Nov 2023
Feeding the American dream with their Asian heritage
Six Asian American and Pacific Islander businesses that have flourished despite the odds


Photographed For The Washington Post
Photo Editor: Monique Woo

These days, it’s common to see a sushi joint on the same street as a McDonald’s. In the past century, Asian American and Pacific Islanders have transformed the American palate. Yet many of these businesses face steeper financial hardships because of the pandemic, economic uncertainty and rising anti-Asian hate.

“They suffered tremendously,” said Min Zhou, director of the Asia Pacific Center at UCLA.

Traditionally, many Asian American and Pacific Islanders found work in restaurants because they faced discrimination in other fields. “That was the only thing that they could do,” said Justin T. Huang, a University of Michigan professor of marketing whose research on anti-Asian racism in the pandemic found that Asian restaurants’ revenue declined more than others. While just 7 percent of Americans identify as Asian, the Pew Research Center recently reported that 12 percent of the country’s restaurants serve Asian food.

A new generation is looking to do more than just survive, said Huang, who added that his grandfather’s work in a restaurant enabled his dad to be a physicist and him to become a professor. “They have a message” to offer, “and they want to now express themselves through food.”

From the oldest tofu enterprise in the nation, to a Filipino fusion food cart that just opened in March, The Washington Post focused during this Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month on six businesses defying the odds, passing down tradition and so much more.
LinkedIn Icon Facebook Icon Twitter Icon
496

Also by Shuran Huang —

Story

Highlights from the Third 2024 Republican Presidential debate

Shuran Huang
Story

NPR: Asian photographers share the stories behind their names

Shuran Huang
Story

Anonymous Portraits

Shuran Huang
Story

The Washington Post: Photos of 21 women voting rights activists

Shuran Huang
Story

For POLITICO: The Crisis Facing Nursing Homes, Assisted Living and Home Care for America’s Elderly

Shuran Huang
Story

For The Wall Street Journal: Working Parents Are Having a Rough Summer. Some Co-Workers Don’t Want to Hear About It.

Shuran Huang
Story

For TIME: The Education of David Hogg

Shuran Huang
Story

For The New York Times: TikTok Stars Go On a D.C. Field Trip

Shuran Huang
Story

For Bloomberg: The Spike in Homelessness in US Cities Isn’t Slowing Down

Shuran Huang
Story

How John Fetterman Came Out of the Darkness

Shuran Huang
Story

Politics Singles

Shuran Huang
Story

Tear Sheets

Shuran Huang
Story

NPR: Two Cantonese Women's Journey: A response to Atlanta Spa Shootings

Shuran Huang
Story

Portraits

Shuran Huang
Story

Strands of Love: A Fourth-Generation Black-Owned Barbershop

Shuran Huang
The Washington Post: Feeding the American dream with their Asian heritage by Shuran Huang
Sign-up for
For more access