A New Nothing

Saturday, February 11, 2017 | News

A New Image / A New Nothing @ http://anewnothing.com/phil-jung-erik-schubert/
96

"Windscreen" featured on The New Yorker's website!

Wednesday, August 10, 2016 | News | Awards & Features

Elated to have my "Windscreen" project featured on The New Yorker's website. Big thanks to Max Campbell for putting it all together!

SURVEYING THE LIVES OF AMERICANS, THROUGH THE WINDOWS OF THEIR PARKED CARS, 

By 

 , 






60

Pahoa Lava Fields,HI 2016

Wednesday, July 6, 2016 | News

1619

New Work up at LACMA

Monday, May 30, 2016 | News | Exhibitions

Very excited to have another one of my images about Hawaii and it's culture up at LACMA.The large-scale commissioned piece is now being shown in conjunction with the Royal Hawaiian Featherwork Exhibition: Na Hulu Ali‘i at LACMA starting on May 22, 2016, and running until August 7, 2016, in the Resnick Pavilion.
2363

A New Nothing

Sunday, April 24, 2016 | News

Follow Erik Shubert and I as we have a visual conversation on A New Nothing created by Ben Alper and Nat Ward.  

A New Nothing

Friday, January 15, 2016 | News

Erik Schubert and I are jumping in on the visual conversation, A New Nothing. Super excited about the mash up and where the work will take us. You can see it all unfold at A New Nothing along with many other amazing photographers. 


Opening Reception

Saturday, May 9, 2015 | News

Hawai'i Friends- Please join me this Sunday, May 10th from 4-6pm for the opening reception of Windscreen at Hawai'i Pacific University. It will be on view at the HPU Art Gallery from May 10 - July 3rd, 2015.

The Hawai‘i Pacific University Art Gallery is located on HPU’s windward Hawai‘i Loa campus, 45-045 Kamehameha Highway, in Kaneohe. Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday, 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Parking and admission is free and the public is invited. For more information call 544-0228.

Check out my short interview Sunday morning with KITV Channel 2 news highlighting the show!

O'ahu work in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Thursday, March 19, 2015 | News

A review of my current exhibition with Joseph Maida "On O'ahu" in the Honolulu Star-Advertiser.


3 days ago

Honolulu Star-Advertiser reviews JOSEPH MAIDA’s New Natives in On O’ahu: Two Views at the Art Gallery at the University of Hawaii, Mānoa, though April 10, 2015.'Foreign' Angles On IslesTwo photographers present a more critical approach through their worksBy David A.M. Goldberg / Special to the Star-Advertiser Mar 15, 2015These days, Hawaii is intensely dedicated to representing itself on its own terms in the pages of its local culture and lifestyle magazines, particularly through photography. As many of these projects enjoy global distribution, one can safely assert that the days of outsiders exclusively crafting the visual narrative of these islands are over. However, there are always things to be learned through the eyes of a sensitive and capable “foreigner.”In “On Oahu: Two Views,” artists Phil Jung and Joseph Maida present some compelling and complex angles on the people and places of this island. Though there is nothing in Maida’s focus on masculine identity and Jung’s raw looks at Oahu that couldn’t have been produced locally, the context of fine art can invite a more critical approach that most of our magazine photographers can’t or won’t risk — or share publicly.Maida’s portraits feature local men, all self-identified as aspiring models and contacted by the artist through social media. Each large-format color photograph is like a fragment of Instagram, promoted to full art status in the light of the gallery. The models chose the locales for their shoots, from bamboo groves to rocky coves. They are stretched out in trees, emerging from tangled mangrove roots, floating in shallow surf like offerings, and washed ashore like mythical creatures. There is sand stuck to skin, and steely blue looks, pouty defiance, low-slung jeans and tattoos of owls, octopus, angel wings, pistols and silhouettes of the island chain. These images speak the “language” of modeling, desire and commerce, but the significance comes from their diversity. While locals may have grown up with “Men of Hawaii” calendars, most everyone else is still working with racist stereotypes of Asian and Polynesian men. Using sexuality and a dash of homoeroticism as a vehicle, these models defy all of those preconceptions, presenting all the genes that have been tumbled together in Hawaii: waif, full, round, cut, pale, brown, gold, smooth.Maida further emphasizes this diversity by titling each photograph with the model’s name and ethnicity, a move that will mean radically different things depending on the viewer. Where mainland folk are fighting over hyphenated identities, a comma-delimited list of one’s ancestry is common for locals. From the Hawaii perspective, the “ethnic diversity” of these men is theoretically a nonissue, thereby potentially weakening the impact of the work for viewers who aren’t inclined to set aside their own preconceptions and givens.Jung’s lens is decidedly more documentarian and less conceptual than Maida’s weaving of the Internet, art tourism and ethnography. He purposely strips Oahu of its gloss, making the light and textures of the island look hard. Softened only by the casual and oblivious humanity of his subjects, these photographs of life in the wake of the sugar and pineapple industries point to the social determinism of Hawaii’s climate, and reminds us that we too lie well south of the Mason-Dixon Line — that imaginary and powerfully symbolic boundary between the continental United States’ North and South and the economics that defined them.Jung captures many moments that a local viewer could easily find herself or himself in. Shots of families at the beach and people going about their everyday life will also be familiar, but it is Jung’s ability to remind us of the power plants, scrap yards, strangled urban streams and minimalist beach amenities that are always in the periphery that jolts the viewer’s consciousness."Children Swimming" is particularly poignant with one girl set to jump from bridge to river, various surf and stand-up boards pulled halfway onto shore, and one swimmer captured with a perfect arc of water being issued through pursed lips. "Lemonade Stand, Hawai‘i" barely conceals a middle finger raised to the Norman Rockwell fantasy of suburban kids getting their first start under capitalism. Jung gives us the celebrated blond-girl innocence, but their unkempt hair, borderline Third World attire and slightly haunting gazes undermine the fantasy — not to mention the charm of consistently spelling "lemonade girls" with a Z.Some will be understandably nonplussed by these projects: local gay men for Maida’s work, and anyone engaged in issues of land and social justice for Jung. But on the whole, Maida and Jung have minimized any impulses toward exoticism or simplification they might harbor, and they have both tried to represent Oahu in a way that acknowledges the priority of the local gaze.It is not often that the visitor, instead of replacing the host’s eyes with their own, offers them as a gift.Copyright (c) Honolulu Star-Advertiser

Honolulu Star-Advertiser reviews Phil Jung’s O'ahu in On O’ahu: Two Views at the Art Gallery at the University of Hawaii, Mānoa, though April 10, 2015.

'Foreign' Angles On Isles

Two photographers present a more critical approach through their works

By David A.M. Goldberg / Special to the Star-Advertiser

 Mar 15, 2015

These days, Hawaii is intensely dedicated to representing itself on its own terms in the pages of its local culture and lifestyle magazines, particularly through photography. As many of these projects enjoy global distribution, one can safely assert that the days of outsiders exclusively crafting the visual narrative of these islands are over. However, there are always things to be learned through the eyes of a sensitive and capable “foreigner.”

In “On Oahu: Two Views,” artists Phil Jung and Joseph Maida present some compelling and complex angles on the people and places of this island. Though there is nothing in Maida’s focus on masculine identity and Jung’s raw looks at Oahu that couldn’t have been produced locally, the context of fine art can invite a more critical approach that most of our magazine photographers can’t or won’t risk — or share publicly.

Maida’s portraits feature local men, all self-identified as aspiring models and contacted by the artist through social media. Each large-format color photograph is like a fragment of Instagram, promoted to full art status in the light of the gallery. The models chose the locales for their shoots, from bamboo groves to rocky coves. They are stretched out in trees, emerging from tangled mangrove roots, floating in shallow surf like offerings, and washed ashore like mythical creatures. There is sand stuck to skin, and steely blue looks, pouty defiance, low-slung jeans and tattoos of owls, octopus, angel wings, pistols and silhouettes of the island chain. 

These images speak the “language” of modeling, desire and commerce, but the significance comes from their diversity. While locals may have grown up with “Men of Hawaii” calendars, most everyone else is still working with racist stereotypes of Asian and Polynesian men. Using sexuality and a dash of homoeroticism as a vehicle, these models defy all of those preconceptions, presenting all the genes that have been tumbled together in Hawaii: waif, full, round, cut, pale, brown, gold, smooth.

Maida further emphasizes this diversity by titling each photograph with the model’s name and ethnicity, a move that will mean radically different things depending on the viewer. Where mainland folk are fighting over hyphenated identities, a comma-delimited list of one’s ancestry is common for locals. From the Hawaii perspective, the “ethnic diversity” of these men is theoretically a nonissue, thereby potentially weakening the impact of the work for viewers who aren’t inclined to set aside their own preconceptions and givens.

Jung’s lens is decidedly more documentarian and less conceptual than Maida’s weaving of the Internet, art tourism and ethnography. He purposely strips Oahu of its gloss, making the light and textures of the island look hard. Softened only by the casual and oblivious humanity of his subjects, these photographs of life in the wake of the sugar and pineapple industries point to the social determinism of Hawaii’s climate, and reminds us that we too lie well south of the Mason-Dixon Line — that imaginary and powerfully symbolic boundary between the continental United States’ North and South and the economics that defined them.

Jung captures many moments that a local viewer could easily find herself or himself in. Shots of families at the beach and people going about their everyday life will also be familiar, but it is Jung’s ability to remind us of the power plants, scrap yards, strangled urban streams and minimalist beach amenities that are always in the periphery that jolts the viewer’s consciousness.

"Children Swimming" is particularly poignant with one girl set to jump from bridge to river, various surf and stand-up boards pulled halfway onto shore, and one swimmer captured with a perfect arc of water being issued through pursed lips. "Lemonade Stand, Hawai‘i" barely conceals a middle finger raised to the Norman Rockwell fantasy of suburban kids getting their first start under capitalism. Jung gives us the celebrated blond-girl innocence, but their unkempt hair, borderline Third World attire and slightly haunting gazes undermine the fantasy — not to mention the charm of consistently spelling "lemonade girls" with a Z.

Some will be understandably nonplussed by these projects: local gay men for Maida’s work, and anyone engaged in issues of land and social justice for Jung. But on the whole, Maida and Jung have minimized any impulses toward exoticism or simplification they might harbor, and they have both tried to represent Oahu in a way that acknowledges the priority of the local gaze.

It is not often that the visitor, instead of replacing the host’s eyes with their own, offers them as a gift.

Copyright (c) Honolulu Star-Advertiser

http://www.hawaii.edu/…/…/uploads/2015/03/on-oahu-review.jpg

Upcoming Exhibition

Wednesday, February 4, 2015 | News

ON O‘AHU : TWO VIEWS 

March 1 – April 10, 2015

The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa

Sunday, March 1
2-3 pm, Gallery walk-through with Phil Jung + Joseph Maida
3-5 pm, Reception
The Art Gallery at the University of Hawai’i at Manoa

Tuesday, March 3
5:15-5:50 pm, Reception
6:00-7:30 pm, Public lecture by Joseph Maida, Intersections Visiting Artist
Art Auditorium

Tuesday, April 7
5:15-5:50 pm, Reception
6:00-7:30 pm, Public lecture by Phil Jung
Art Auditorium

Phil Jung offers an honest and genuine exploration into the island of O'ahu's extremely complex social system. The cultural identity, wealth distribution and social mobility of Hawaii's residents frequently contrasts with its idyllic backdrop. Staying clear of common “mainland” assumptions, Jung uses his camera to explore the relationship between the people who inhabit O'ahu and the landscape that binds them all together. His photos act as a loose narrative of contemporary culture in Hawai‘i.

Joseph Maida presents New Natives, a group of portraits of aspiring male models of mixed ethnicity and race from Hawai‘i. The subjects were scouted from New York through social media and photographed in their local terrain around the metropolis of Honolulu. Drawing from Hawaii’s royal history as well as its Eastern and Western influences, this series introduces visions of masculinity, identity, and sexuality that upend conventional hegemony on multiple registers.

Displaying 1– of 9 most recent