Shuran Huang 舒然

Photographer
     
"You are not alone": The Asian and Black bond
Location: Washington D.C.
Nationality: Chinese
Biography: Shuran Huang 黃舒然 (she/her) is a Cantonese photojournalist based in Washington, D.C. Through moments of intimacy, her work focuses on politics, immigration, human rights, diaspora experiences, and interactions in between. She speaks fluent English,... MORE
Public Story
"You are not alone": The Asian and Black bond
Copyright Shuran Huang 2022
Updated Sep 2020
Topics Documentary, Editorial, Essays, Photography, Spotlight
The international Black Lives Matter protests have been ongoing for months. The killing of George Floyd has revealed the country’s legacy of slavery and has exposed the world’s ingrained displays of colorism and systemic racism towards African Americans.

In East Asia, colorism is a seldom discussed issue, and the ideology of anti-blackness continues to infiltrate into many societies. We are often told to avoid getting darker under the sunlight and making friends with people of Black descent.

My personal experience growing up in a society with some ideology of anti-blackness compelled me to search for an answer: How can I help build the missing connection between Asians and the African American community? Recently, with the significant increase of hate crimes against Asians due to the global pandemic COVID-19, has seemingly intertwined itself with the prejudice towards African Americans. The matter of unifying these communities has become more urgent in dealing with racism.

This portrait project features some Asian protestors, along with their reasons for supporting the ongoing Black Lives Matter protests. Twenty-four-year-old Kai says that being part of the protests provides him an opportunity to examine his own biases towards African Americans. Matt Chan expresses that “As Martin Luther King Jr. said that ‘Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere’, so it is important to show our support as a member of the Asian community”. Chinese American, Jamie Wan, says “Black Americans have been fighting for civil rights for not just themselves but for everyone in this country, we benefit from everything that they have done” and Elissa Trieu emphasizes that “Me and a lot of my brothers and cousins have been trying to start conversations from home to emphasize the importance of having a political voice”. These testimonials provide powerful messages that are increasing the bond between these two communities and reveal that younger Asian generations are waking up from their previous generations’ deeply rooted stereotypes.
3,372

Also by Shuran Huang 舒然 —

STORY

Politics

Shuran Huang 舒然
STORY

Tearsheets

Shuran Huang 舒然
STORY

Lady Bird Bar

Shuran Huang 舒然
STORY

NPR: 2 Cantonese Women's Journey: A response to Atlanta Spa Shootings

Shuran Huang 舒然
STORY

Portraits

Shuran Huang 舒然
STORY

Live music returns to D.C.

Shuran Huang 舒然
STORY

An U.S. Army Afghan interpreter reunites with his family

Shuran Huang 舒然 / Dulles International Airport
STORY

Questions about policing on Ocean City Boardwalk

Shuran Huang 舒然
STORY

Kids are finally back at school

Shuran Huang 舒然
STORY

The long waitlist

Shuran Huang 舒然 / Maryland
STORY

Minan, Michelle

Shuran Huang
STORY

Strands of Love: A Four-Generation Black-Owned Barbershop

Shuran Huang / Syrcuse, New York
STORY

A weekend of celebrations after Biden's win

Shuran Huang / Washington D.C.
STORY

The Unspoken 4%: A story on Asian American Voters

Shuran Huang / Pennsylvania
STORY

"You are not alone": The Asian and Black bond during the Black Lives Matter protests

Shuran Huang / Washington D.C.
STORY

Copy of Foster Migrant Children

Shuran Huang
STORY

Photo Editing

Shuran Huang
STORY

Foster Migrant Children

Shuran Huang
STORY

Portraits

Shuran Huang
STORY

Wushu Education

Shuran Huang / Virginia
STORY

Justice & Alannah

Shuran Huang / New Orleans
STORY

Preview: Strands of Love

Shuran Huang / Syrcuse, New York
Join us
For more access