Omar Havana

Photographer
    
35 years searching for justice in Cambodia
Location: Paris, France
Nationality: Spanish
Biography: Omar Havana, 1975 Granada, Spain. Spanish Freelance Photojournalist. Based in Paris, France. Previously based in Asia. ( Nepal 2014-2015 and Cambodia 2008 - 2014 ; 2015-2017) Omar has worked as a professional photojournalist since 2005, and since... read on

Close to two million people were killed during the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia, a generation lost in a country where the word happiness was eradicated from the dictionary. Onboard of a bus, fifty survivors, many of them civil parties at the Khmer Rouge Tribunal, traveled from different provinces throughout the country to recover a small part of what was murdered by Pol Pot and his “brothers”.

On 7 August 2014, Cambodia's UN-backed Khmer Rouge Tribunal sentenced two former Khmer Rouge leaders, Nuon Chea, also known as "Brother Number Two", and Khieu Samphan, former head of State, to life in prison after being convicted on charges of crimes against humanity. Arrested in 2009, the two Khmer Rouge leaders were charged with crimes against humanity and genocide. The first trial in Case 002, known as Case 002/01, which began on 21 November 2011 and, after 20 months of evidentiary hearings, concluded in late October 2013, focused on charges of crimes against humanity in relation to forced population movements and the execution of Khmer Republic soldiers at Tuol Po Chrey in Pursat Province, as well as the two defendants' role in developing Khmer Rouge regime policies.

In April 1975, the Communist Party of Kampuchea, also known as the Khmer Rouge, seized power in Cambodia, forcibly relocating the population to work in labor camps around the country and imprisoning an increasing number of people. Up until the regime's overthrow in January 1979, the policies that were put in place resulted in the creation of a state defined by repression and massacres. Close to two million people lost their lives, due to forced labor, starvation, torture and executions.

Since then, many of the Khmer Rouge leaders, including Pol Pot, have escaped judgment, dying of old age before they were ever called to be judged. Yesterday, 35 years after Cambodia was returned to the Cambodians, two of the former Khmer Rouge leaders, Khieu Samphan and Nuon Chea, were given life sentences for crimes against humanity by a United Nations-backed tribunal that has taken too long to give back a bit of peace to those who lost family during the most horrific period in the history of Cambodia.

As one of the survivors said after the pronouncement of the life sentence, happiness is too big of a word to describe what this sentence has finally brought to Cambodia and for those who have been searching for justice since 1979.

“I am not happy. Nothing will bring my family back. But now everyone knows that they were murdered by the Khmer Rouge. Many of the leaders are still there, others have died without being accused. But today finally we have that bit of justice that we have been fighting for since the beginning”.


Photography: ©Omar Havana / Getty Images. All Rights Reserved



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By Omar Havana —

VISUAL STORY

CEMENTery

By Omar Havana / Kampong Trach — Millions of years ago, a cluster of coral reefs stood firm here as the water receded, leaving them..
VISUAL STORY

The Bucolic Life of a Cambodian Grandmother Accused of Mass Killings

By Omar Havana / Anlong Veng, cambodia — In this dusty mountain hamlet on the Thai border, she is known as Grandma Chaem. The tiny 74-year-old lives..
VISUAL STORY

They Smashed Banks for Pol Pot. Now They’re Founding Them

By Omar Havana / Malai cambodia — When the Khmer Rouge were ousted in 1979, they retreated to strongholds like Malai on the western fringes..
VISUAL STORY

Breaking tradition among Nepal's Maithil women

By Omar Havana / Janakpur, Nepal — Like many women in the Maithil community in Nepal, Manjula Thakur found her life severely restricted and..
VISUAL STORY

Bonjour, Paris

By Omar Havana / Paris — "The meaning of the other and love have disappeared from this society. Without money, people do not..
VISUAL STORY

Trapped: the Dark Side of Cambodia's Beer Gardens

By Omar Havana / Siem Reap — Throughout Cambodia, thousands of women, most of them under the age of 25, work in beer gardens, karaoke..
VISUAL STORY

When the Earth Shook Nepal

By Omar Havana / Nepal — A 7.8 magnitude earthquake struck Nepal on April 25th, 2015, shaking the already-impoverished nation to its..
VISUAL STORY

A woman's Cry: The detention of Tep Vanny

By Omar Havana / Phnom Penh — Tep Vanny is Cambodia’s most famous activist and the leader of the women of Boeung Kak Lake, who..
VISUAL STORY

Devotees of the Ink

By Omar Havana / Nakhom Pathom — Once a year, thousands of people from all over Thailand travel to the Wat Bang Phra temple, located about..
VISUAL STORY

Inside a Cambodian Slaughterhouse

By Omar Havana / Siem Reap — In a country where the demand for meat is ever-increasing and where pork is generally favored,..
VISUAL STORY

The Way

By Omar Havana / Greece — More than 100,000 refugees and migrants have arrived in Greece since the beginning of 2016. They cross the..
VISUAL STORY

The Khmer Fighters

By Omar Havana / Siem Reap — Pradal Serey or Kun Khmer -free fighting- is an unarmed martial art from Cambodia. Compared to other forms..
VISUAL STORY

My Country Is My Family

By Omar Havana / Nepal — Surrounded by stunning forest, Beldangi is an example of how a refugee camp should be. Only one banner and..
VISUAL STORY

Evicting Dreams: The Last Days of the White Building

By Omar Havana / Phnom Penh — On June 6th, the faces of the residents of the White Building showed the sadness of what were their..
VISUAL STORY

The Angkor Hell

By Omar Havana / Siem Reap — Just a few dozen kilometers away from the world-famous Angkor temples, about 300 people have lived for the..
VISUAL STORY

La Vie En Jaune

By Omar Havana / Paris, — Hundreds of thousands of “Gilet Jaunes” (meaning “Yellow Vest” in French) have..
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