Octavio Hoyos

Photographer
     
Militarization
Location: Mexico City
Nationality: Mexican
Biography: Octavio Hoyos. Mexico City, 1974. Study journalism in the Universidad del Distrito Federal in Mexico City. Start in the photo agency Imagenlatina in the 2000. In 2003 join to the national newspaper Milenio as a staff photographer. Has been... MORE
Public Story
Militarization
Copyright Octavio Hoyos 2023
Updated Nov 2022
Location Mexico
Topics Abuse, Army, Arrests and Prosecutions, Breaking News, Civil Rights, Conflict, Crime, Documentary, Editorial, Essays, Fear, Historical, Human Rights, International Stories, Journalism, Latin America, Militarization, Military, Oppression, Photography, Photojournalism, Politics, Social Justice, Soldiers, Violence, War, War and its effects, World
The government of the Mexican president Andrés Manuel López Obrador has been characterized by giving all the support to the country´s Armed Forces. At the beginning of his term and due to pressure of the former president Donald Trump to stop migration from Central and South American countries, López Obrador defined a new security group called National Guard. Created from what was the Federal Preventive Police and later the Federal Police, corporations forged by previous governments that now are severe opponents of the current administration who refer to them as Neoliberals.
By means of an immediate and authorized decree with a majority in the Congresses of Mexico, the National Guard acted as a retaining wall on the northern border of Mexico to prevent the migration to the US. Currently,  another proposal was to annex the National Guard within the ranks of the Mexican Army and thus join forces. In the same way, a reform in the constitution was authorized in which the participation of the Army and Navy in citizen security operations is extended until the year 2028.
For decades there have been accusations of misuse of functions of the Mexican Army against citizens, such as the disappearance of students of Ayotzinapa in Guerrero or the massacre of Tlatelolco.
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