Alain Licari

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Alain Licari. Biography Born in France, I’ve lived in Spain and now enjoy a life in New York City.  A self-taught photographer, I am inspired by traditional black-and-white humanist photography, particularly... read on
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About

Coverage Regions: Europe Latin America USA & Canada
Languages Spoken: French, Spanish, English
Years of experience: 6 to 10
HEFAT certification? no

Alain Licari. Biography




Born in France, I’ve lived in Spain and now enjoy a life in New York City.  A self-taught photographer, I am inspired by traditional black-and-white humanist photography, particularly the great masters like Sebastiao Salgado and Raymond Depardon.


Traveling around the globe, I create photo essays that cross art photography with photojournalism. I attach importance to producing an elegant photo —une mise en scène—in a geographical, social and humanistic context, with an emphasis on the latter.  By catching the eyes of another, I seek a moment and a connection—in the humblest way—with the human soul.  Even more, I want these simple shots of everyday life to raise questions.  After my time in the United States, topics related to politics, migration and the diversity of the American Continent—both the North and the South—have gained particular interest.


The personal concept of mise en scèneis important to my photographic work. Though I do not take part in the composition of what plays out before me, it’s important that, while shooting in a street, I find a balance between the different plans of the scène, looking for harmonies and connections with the lines and the characters who comprise the photograph. In this way, I build a narration that will be interpreted by the future spectator.


Finally, I choose to make primarily black-and-white photographs in order to create a particular relationship between the viewer and the print.  Black-and-white encourages a certain distance from the subject, keeping the meaning of the photo open and fluid.  I appreciate when the viewer’s eyes are guided subtly and gently through tone and light, allowing each person to slip into her or her interpretation and quietly find their own meaning within.